Insights & Art

Straight from the dome to the plate.

Tag: Art

Crazy Rich Asians: Beyond the Confines of the Screen

CRA Banner

Is it possible to separate the viewer from the viewed? A difficult question, but one which nonetheless appears when I think of this film. For me, so much of Crazy Rich Asians (2018) exists outside the confines of the screen that sometimes I feel like I’m not so much as commenting on this film but rather the cultural context around it.

Is that fair to Jon M. Chu’s piece of work? Is it fair to view the film not as an individual piece of art, but something embedded into the cultural zeitgeist of the time? I’m not entirely sure. One cannot deny that this film attempted to challenge the preconceptions surrounding the Asian ethnicity. The opening scene with the matriarch; Eleanor Sung-Young (Michelle Yeoh), was very much a giant middle finger to the feelings of cultural alienation that Asians have felt in Western culture for decades, if not centuries. The cartoonish Caucasian men rudely denying Eleanor a place to stay at the luxurious hotel for no explicit reason is understood to be a racist (or even possibly sexist) attack at her: Conclusions which the audience came to because of ‘reasons’ outside the screen. Once again, the question must be asked, “Should we see Chu’s film as an independent piece of work, or does it lose a lot of its significance once it is removed from its context?”

At the beginning of this year I made a promise to myself to refrain from consuming ‘mediocre art’. Yet, why did I watch Crazy Rich Asians if I expected it to be a somewhat generic romantic comedy? I’ll be honest, if the cast were not a majority Asian and if it wasn’t a big milestone for Asians in the West then I would not have watched it.

“Is it possible to separate the viewer from the viewed?”

Is the promise of seeing yourself represented positively, a good enough reason to consume a piece of art? It’s not like my love of the Godfather was tainted by the lack of Asians, nor did the lack of diversity make The Dark Knight any less enjoyable. Maybe, watching a film to see your ethnicity portrayed in a more appealing light isn’t a solid philosophical justification but it is also important to recognise that all attempts to separate the art from the context is impossible as both parties shape each other.

Was it wrong to watch Crazy Rich Asians because it was cultural comfort food? Entertaining and fun but definitely not intellectually challenging. I don’t know. But I watched it anyway.

There were quite a few moments which Crazy Rich Asians made me pause, not because it was showing anything which was revolutionary but rather because it just portrayed an Asian lead like the protagonist of any romantic comedies; attractive. Near the beginning of the film, there was a scene where an absurdly muscular Michael Teo (Pierre Png) walks out of the shower and approaches his wife; Astrid Leong-Teo. It was quite an exploitative scene and very objectifying. But there was no small penis joke, nor did a calculator fall out of his pocket nor was he being bullied for getting good grades.

He was just an attractive male, who also happened to be Asian.

Strange.

Likewise, I was also shocked that a lot of the music in this film was Chinese, with a few classics from Teresa Tang (甜甜密) and a few additional catchy tunes sung with Mandarin lyrics (我要你的愛). Even if this was a film that was located in Singapore with an all-Asian cast, it still stunned me that the director was going so far as to insert Chinese songs. It also made me a little uncomfortable, not because the songs didn’t fit, I thought the jazz-infused tunes were catchy and fit the city of Singapore; an Asian city with Western influences. But because I had subconsciously expected an English or French song to signify love.

None of these directorial choices are intellectually significant but culturally they are. So how do we judge this film’s merit as a piece of art?

Crazy Rich Asians heralds the rise of East Asia and the increasing influence that economic powerhouses like Korea, Japan and China wield upon world culture. The Asian demographic has become such a financial lucrative draw that even Hollywood is making films which specifically tell the Asian narrative. Maybe because of this, Hollywood green-lit a story that glamourises wealth and excess hedonism. This is a story about the 1% of the 1%; the gorgeous Astrid buys a pair of million dollar earrings nonchalantly and Bernard Tai rents a cargo ship for a bachelor party. Maybe I wasn’t the target audience since I was never impressed by the unchecked capitalism on display and soon the dialogue about bank accounts and designer cars started to irritate me.

I’ve heard it be argued that this film doesn’t celebrate excess wealth because Nick married a girl who was significantly poorer than him. But that always seemed to be a comment on Confucianism; the tension between filial piety and individualism. Rachel (an embodiment of Western thinking) earns the respect of Eleanor because she forgoes love (Nick’s proposal) for reasons greater than herself; his relationship to his family. This selfless act wins the Young family’s trust and thus she is welcomed into the house. However, for me, the ending reflect this film’s stance on wealth; crazy rich Asians celebrating an engagement on top of a crazy rich high-rise in Singapore. I understand that part of the reason for the cartoonish display of opulence was to juxtapose the Young family to Rachel’s docile upbringing; but as someone who thinks East Asia is already too obsessed with money, the celebration of excess seemed jarring.

Another moment that urked me more than I would have expected is the little fling between annoyingly-arrogant Bernard and the gold-digging Kitty. The pair get touchy during the celebration of Colin and Araminta’s after party and get caught out for their faux pas, much to the delight (and squeals) of the people who were attending. It felt odd for a film which attempted to expose how stressful Asian family dynamics can be due to gossiping to then make a joke about characters acting inappropriately. This was the Asian equivalent to a fart joke, it got a little chuckle from the audience but it seemed counterproductive for a film which seemed to be highlighting the overbearing elements of filial piety.

The question remains; “Should one attempt to see Crazy Rich Asians without factoring in the context around the film?” If this is even possible, it is certainly a hard task. The quotes from various important individuals within the film industry praising the film’s success whilst emphasising the financial risk that Warner Bros. took to produce a film with an all-Asian cast inherently reflects the cultural glass ceilings that Chu had to break before production had even started.

For me, it’s not possible, at least not in 2018. As someone who rarely see Asian representation in Western media, supporting this film went beyond just a question of artistic merit. And I think this film understands this, Chu carefully crafted this film in order to break the cultural assumptions of its time. Will this story be as widely received or ‘unique’ in a time where tales of attractive Singaporean bachelors and wealthy Hong Kong mansions are the norm? Most likely not. Maybe, this film’s power comes not from what is depicted within the camera, but the cultural assumptions it challenges outside it. Maybe this makes Crazy Rich Asians a propaganda piece or a mediocre piece of art, I think both cases could be argued. But as someone who got a celebratory message from a close friend for watching a film which explored an Asian narrative in the Western world. Maybe Crazy Rich Asians was the right film at the right time to break the mould.

Advertisements

The Thinglyness of Thingly Things

japan

What do you make of Heidegger’s way of reading artworks, equipment and things in relationship with each other in “The Origin of the Work of Art”? 

Martin Heidegger’s The Origin of the Work of Art attempts to explore the metaphysical aspect behind ‘things’ and their ‘thinglyness’. In particular, his essays focus upon the difference between ‘equipment’ and ‘art’, the uses of these differences and the consequences. By exploring the thinglyness within both equipment and art, Heidegger touches upon many important and reoccurring concepts such as Aletheia, existentiality and the rift between ‘Earth’ and ‘World’. Heidegger wishes for us to move away from the traditional western view of the subject/object dynamic, with the object having agency and the subject purely being a recipient of that will. Instead Heidegger argues for the being of all things, and all human experience involves the ‘sacrifice’ of the subject which willingly gives itself up to the object/human in order to create a new reality. Thus Heidegger’s views on things, equipment and art attempt to move away from these ingrained notions into his realm of metaphysics.

It is important to look past the physical material or earthliness of art or equipment and to understand what Heidegger perceived to be the core thinglyness of all things. Heidegger says one of the most difficult tasks is to simply “let beings be” and “let things be things”, because humans have constructed the world and their language in such a way that a book is not just a ‘thing’ instead there are many different associations and connotations which cloud the thinglyness from the view of humans. A book fosters up images of pages, font and book covers, yet it can fail to highlight the true thinglyness of a book; an instrument to communicate from the author to the reader; a physical instrument which if read can ‘melt’ away the physical world and teleport the author into the pages (Groden, Kreiswirth & Szeman). I think this speaks to the core of Heidegger’s philosophy which resonated around the core of simplicity and how these distractions chip away from the fundamental desires and goals of being. These distractions serve to cover up what is ‘nearest’ in our lives such as death, love and art whilst emphasising what is most ‘remote’, superficial relationships and attempting to foster social acknowledgement. These veilings of what is closest to the human ‘Being’ will lead us astray and cause humans to focus upon matters which are not important instead of striving for Aletheia or the desire to be great.

For equipment, Heidegger saw it as formed matter, something derived of the earth which was shaped by an external agency. Aristotle’s analogy of the wax stamp is another way to understand Heidegger’s thoughts on the creation of equipment: The wax stamp is comprised of two different ‘parties’ the wax and the stamp which shaped it; yet when understanding the wax stamp, it is impossible to fully separate the ‘form’ and the ‘matter’; the object and the subject. The most important aspect of equipment is the purpose which lies behind it; it is this linear objective which separates equipment from the realm of art. Understanding something holistically is a reoccurring theme within Heidegger and a key reason why he believes that science can never simply reach any truth within the realm of human understanding. The separation and the over-analysis of something conceals its thinglyness in pursuit of ‘more accurate information’. For Heidegger whose philosophy has elements of Romantic thought, understanding light as wave lengths completely destroys the other real effects and associations with light such as warmth, safety and the divine. Heidegger’s quote “the thingness of the thing remains concealed, forgotten. The nature of the thing never comes to light, that is, it never gets a hearing” reflects his belief that science simply rewords what is already ‘known’ and does not impart new knowledge. As a romantic and an admirer of eastern philosophy which moves away from the intense desire to categorise and rationalise within western philosophy, I appreciate Heidegger’s attempts to create a philosophy which is much more interconnected with the physical human experience. I often find myself asking whether western philosophy is motivated for the sake of information or if it is truly trying to uncover a ‘Truth’ to better human society.

Equipment’s main objective is to try to unlock what Heidegger calls the existentiality within things in order to create works of art. Existentiality refers to the glimpsing and unlocking of one’s potential and moving from the ‘actuality’ to the ‘possible’. Whilst this Heideggerian concept is often used to label people who never challenge the status-quo and simply ‘exist’, without deeper considerations for the philosophy of life. In many ways the unlocking of nature’s beauty from a ‘thing’ to a work of art also falls in line with this concept or ascending into something greater. The beauty behind an axe is found in its ability to shape the natural environment in order to create art, whilst art’s beauty shines its radiance or ability to transport an individual into another ‘World’. One may notice how this Heideggerian belief on equipment and its uses mirrors natural law, which rewarded the unlocking and shaping of the natural world in order to forward civilisation.

This stance upon equipment and purpose is noticeably different to how Heidegger perceives art; Heidegger is especially strong in his love and respect for art and its ability to unconceal the ‘Truth’. Whilst equipment prides itself on being ‘non-distracting’ and being formed in a way where the matter or its ‘earthly thinglyness’ doesn’t get noticed or get in the way of an objective: Art is the total opposite as the artist attempts to bring attention to every choice and decision made in the crafting of the artwork; whether this is a musical note, a paint stroke or the chiselling of a statute. In this sense, the art is the real catalyst and creative origin whilst the artist and the equipment are simply the conduits to Aletheia; “like a passage which destroys itself in the progress”.

In order to understand great works of art, it is necessary to decipher two Heideggerian terms; ‘World’ and ‘Earth’, which in true Heidggerian fashion sounds like synonyms yet represents something completely different. The ‘World’ is a fictional reality which one is transported to when they are engaging with high art, for an example, entering an ancient temple may sever one’s connection to the outside physical as they are moved to another realm where the gods dwell. The ‘Earth’ however is the physical ground upon which this temple or piece of art is built, yet the unlike the ‘World’ is in a constant sense of unveiling, the ‘Earth’ attempts to conceal itself, never fully letting a human comprehend it completely. For a painting or a vase, the ‘Earth’ comprises of the physicality of the thing, from the brushstrokes to the grainy texture and colours respectively. Yet the concealing of high art is why certain films, paintings and poems compromise of many meanings and that it may take many viewings before one can come to an understanding; and even then it may not be complete.

By immersing the audience in the greatness of their craft, an artist creates a rift between World and Earth, and the tension is which allows audience to glance at the ‘Truth’. It is important to note that equipment doesn’t have this worldly element to it, nor does it inspire great feelings since equipment is simply there to make achieving an objective easier. However, equipment and art share a mutual relationship, since art can only be formed with the assistance of equipment and equipment only has value in creating. Interesting, artworks are much more depended upon the ‘World’ which surrounds the thing; thus is an ancient statute is removed from their native ‘World’ which they naturally inhabit, their ability to bring viewers into their ‘World’ is severely reduced. Once again, equipment does not have this aspect to its thinglyness, instead, equipment remains linear regardless of the situation and is only not ‘useful’ if it is outclassed by other equipment.

I find Heidegger’s metaphysics fascinating because there is such a cyclical element to it and I see the joining of artworks and equipment to be in a sense a hermeneutic circle where one can only understood by exploring the other concepts in a circular notion. Continuing this metaphor of the hermeneutic circle, Heidegger also sees ‘Truth’ through a similar lens, ‘Truth’ or Aletheia is circular. By unconcealing certain information, another element gets shrouded in darkness and thus Heidegger entertains a relativisitic conception of Truth which is subject to a person’s context, instead of something which is self-evident and unchallengeable. Heidegger perceives great art as one of the few ways to uncover the Truth, and this is only possible when the audience or viewer concentrates deeply without outside distraction. Heidegger’s analysis of the Van Gogh’s painting A Pair of Shoes paints a vivid picture of the thinglyness of the shoes, “From the dark opening of the worn insides of the shoes the toilsome tread of the worker stares forth.” It is important to distinguish that Heidegger insists art is a window to Truth and not to what is ‘true’. Using Van Gogh’s shoes for an example, the painting’s objective is not to accurately depict the physical aesthetics of a peasant shoe, instead the brush strokes, colour and lighting all create a picture of suffering and scarcity which is the thinglyness of the shoes; the true soul of the object. Interesting that whilst Heidegger argues that equipment (shoes) will never be able to create the tension between the World and Earth which is necessary to inspire and communicate the Truth: Heidegger picks an artwork depicting a pair of shoes (equipment) to highlight the power of art to create Aletheia, ironically highlighting only through a work of art can a pair of worn out shoes transcend their physical equipment uses and create a World for the audience to merge into.

At the core of Martin Heidegger’s The Origin of the Work of Art is his attempt to distinguish and identify the differences in the thinglyness of things. For Heidegger, acknowledging the physical differences between artworks and equipment was not enough; only through understanding the differences in objective and purpose did one understand equipment and artwork. Heidegger’s admiration of high art and its transformative power is evident through his essay; whilst equipment is not placed upon such a privileged status, it is still essential in the creation of art. Art’s ability to open a World is essential in Aletheia; the uncovering of Truth. In many cases, it is through this unveiling of Truth that humans are able to see the irony between ‘remoteness and nearness’ and how many beings attempt to escape from ‘confronting’ topics like death, life and purpose. For Heidegger, very few things are more important than art which has the ability to peel back this façade of social normativity which humans have imposed upon their surroundings. As stated above, art can only be created through equipment and it is equipment; the unsung heroes, which are responsible for creating the environment or situation for the art to come forth from. Equipment rarely draws attention to itself and unlike art, the less noticeable it is, the more effective it is at being equipment. This hermeneutic circle stands at the core of Heidegger’s metaphysical analysis of the thinglyness of both parties; connecting artworks and equipment in a never ending dance, as never ending partners.

Ten Orchestral Pieces.

f04da2db11220f80971f26

236723

Joe Hisaishi and Jeremy Zuckerman, my two favourite composer as of now.

I was and still am really hesitant to write this article, music is a universal language which communicates through emotions and memories, all tangible feelings but that also makes it incredibly hard to write about. How do you accurately describe a triumphant crescendo? There’s no doubt that my own personal experiences and emotions will affect how I interpret that piece, but how can I accurately communicate these thoughts to the wider audience? Though, regardless I think orchestral is one of the most undervalued genres of music and sadly there is a distinct lack of exposure since it doesn’t fit into ‘pop music.’

This is a key reason why I am writing this article, hopefully I will be able to intelligently and articulately explore how these pieces of music have touched me without allowing my writing to becomes overly personal and incomprehensible. I have written another article about the orchestral genre and unfortunately I decided to name it “Top Ten Orchestral” pieces, completely ignoring the fact that my knowledge in this field is still very shallow and that my top ten list would be constantly changing. Of course I will not be mentioning any of the songs I wrote about in my previous piece which you can find here.

Personally, I define orchestral as a more modern variation of classical music and whilst classical composers like Bach, Mozart and Verdi have all stamped their legacy upon the history of the world. My heart has been whisked away by composers like Akihiko Matsumoto, Jeremy Zuckerman and Yoko Shimomura.The most beautiful aspect of orchestral music is how the absence of words means that the audience can easily and freely substitute their emotions into the piece, orchestral music really is a blank canvas, allowing listeners to paint however they please.

“Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything.” – Plato

________________________________________________________________________


Title: Fantasia Alla Marcia
From: Kingdom Hearts II
Composer: Yoko Shimomura

What a musical journey, this is a song which incorporates many different emotions, from genuine warmth, to impending doom to glorious victory. This song starts off casually, a bouncy and bright melody that quickly transforms into a heart wrenching melody, softly whispering silent pains into the soul of the audiences. Then like a lion, it announces it’s return and it finishes upon a crescendo, the darkness is cast aside! The Keyblade remains undefeated and chaos has been imprisoned! One complaint I have of classical pieces is that too often the changes between their melodies seems forced, unnatural and inconsistent, the biggest strength of this piece is Shimomura’s ability to guide the listeners on a journey of highs and lows.

Now if only Square Enix could release Kingdom Hearts within the next century and on the PS3, that would be fantastic.


Title: The Village in May
From: My Neighbor Totoro
Composer: Joe Hisaishi

Joy to the world! Flirty without compromise, Hisaishi delivers one of his most memorable works for a Studio Ghibli classic. This song perfectly captures the innocent and curiosity of youth and in particular of Mei, the younger sister of the protagonist; Satsuki. It was clear that Hisaishi was trying to reflect the optimism and energy of youth, for myself this song triggers buried memories of picnics, sunflowers and spring; the simple events in life which give colour to our existence.


Title: Greatest Change
From: The Legend of Korra, Book One
Composer: Jeremy Zuckerman
Such power and strength, for anyone that has visited my blog they will know I am a huge fan of animation and The Last Airbender and Legend of Korra series both have a special place in my heart. Zuckerman has one of the most original sounds I’ve ever heard as both Michael DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko wanted Zuckerman to create music which deviated from traditional styles. Zuckerman has managed to combine eastern instruments with the spirit of western orchestra to produce some of the most mesmerising music I have ever heard. Jeremy Zuckerman’s music was the emotional heart beat of Avatar The Last Airbender and Legend of Korra, his impact on these works and my life can not be understated.

For me, this song represents growth and evolution, it starts off timid, shy and reserved but slowly the melody grows stronger, embolden by its success, until finally it creates a tidal of emotion to overwhelm the listener. The thunder of the drums further adds to the power flow of this piece, like a flash of stallions, galloping along a river.


Title: 150 Million Miracles
From: Summer Wars
Composer: Akihiko Matsumoto

“And if you remember nothing else, remember to find time to eat together as a family. Even when times are rough; especially when times are rough. There’s no lack of painful things in this world, but hunger and loneliness must surely be two of the worst.”

Having an angelic choir is one of the oldest tricks in the book, it adds a gorgeous sincere element to the music and the same could be said for 150 Million Miracles. Of course as someone who has watched and loved Summer Wars, I feel a much stronger connection to this piece of music than strangers to Hosada’s film, played during a very intense and emotional moment; for me this song speaks about family, loyalty and love.


Title: Omnis Lacrima
From: Final Fantasy XV
Composer: Yoko Shimomura

The goddess of Japanese orchestral strikes again, the flames of human adrenaline, the frenzy of battle and the fall of great empires. Omnis Lacrima taps into the darker elements of humanity, our desire for glory and our sub conscious thirst to vanquish our foes. Humans are a fickle species, being able to simultaneously shed tears for nameless victims of a tragedy whilst inflicting death in the name of love and loyalty. The crescendo of drums, trumpets and voices at the start of the song combined with the driving beat and the Latin choir produces a chilling piece of music, full of passion, courage and power.


Title: Ruby & Sapphire Ending Theme (I presume)
From: Pokemon Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald
Composer: Junichi Masuda

You could definitely make the case that I spent too much of my youth playing with my Pokemon Ruby and pretending my Blaziken was real. But did I regret spending over 300 hours training my Pokemon, capturing basically every Pokemon I could except that pesky Huntail and beating the Elite Four over and over again to the point where I could remember every single Pokemon the trainers had? NO. This song is so nostalgic for me, sending me down a roller coaster of memories from a close friend giving me a Camerupt EX trainer card, to switching Rayquaza to abuse the Air Lock ability to negate Solar Beam. I don’t expect my readers to be so emotionally charged when listening to this gorgeous piece, but one can still appreciate how lightly the keys echo, how the soft music seems to coat and soothe the soul. Sunflowers, seashells and a picnic with a beautiful girl in a grassy mellow.

Long live Hoenn, long live Swampert and long live Treecko.


Title: The Name of Life
From: Spirited Away
Composer: Joe Hisaishi

Joe Hisaishi at his very best, riveting and seductive. Like other Hisaishi pieces such as Journey to the West and Laputa: Castle in the Sky, he manages to intertwine bitter sadness, optimism and joy in a single piece. Whilst the echoing piano notes contain a sombre element, when stringed together, this piece of music delivers a powerful emotional punch. For the frequent listeners of Hisaishi, they may notice a distinct resemblance to One Summer’s Day which was featured in the critically acclaimed Spirited Away (arguably the 21st century’s version of Akira, in terms of influence and introducing Japanese animation to western nations). However One Summer’s Day lacks the haunting piano keys at the start of this piece, arguably my favourite section of this song (excuse the lack of musical terminology).


Title: Traffic Jam
From: Halo ODST
Composer: Martin O’Donnell

Martin O’Donnell’s music has the ability to transform the mundane into the spectacular, the ordinary into the chaotic and the predictable into a frenzy of movement. This piece starts with it’s head held high, every note reflecting its proud and militaristic origins, every thud of the dream saluting a distant victory. War is dangerous, filled with sorrow and suffering, but amongst such conditions, iron bonds of camaraderie are formed. This is a thunderous salute to the selflessness of sacrifice to the men and women who would die for their country and their peers.

Lock and load marines, time to flank some elites.


Title: Dearly Beloved
From: Kingdom Hearts I
Composer: Yoko Shimomura

I would often leave my PlayStation 2 on all day with my Kingdom Hearts disc inserted just to hear this song on repeat and repeat… And repeat. This is as bitter sweet as it comes, a tale of star crossed lovers, redemption and separation. Honestly, it’s hard to write about this song, it’s one of the defining soundtracks of my younger days. There’s something magical and soothing about Dearly Beloved’s soft and angelic start, like the final hug from a departing friend, or the warmth of twilight stars. Arthur Schopenhauer argued that music was the purest form of literature because of its ability to produce unfiltered emotions, unlike other mediums such as books or films which required the creation of situations, events and characters to move the audience. A tranquil song like Dearly Beloved is both haunting and beautiful and even cultural barriers can not hinder its message of loneliness. Music expresses emotions in its purest form, I truly believe that.

Press play and let the music sweep you away to a land of wonder and tranquility.


Title: Legend of Korra Ending Song (Has not been officially released, no official title)
From: Legend of Korra, Book Four
Composer: Jeremy Zuckerman

I had to. I had no choice.

Music has the ability to make or break films and television shows, adding a subtle splash of depth and emotion to accompany the visual. The finale of Legend of Korra impaled my heart, it was like losing a friend, a friend you never fully appreciated, but someone who was tenderly loving and supportive. Bryan Konietzko and Michael Di Martino told Jeremy Zuckerman to deliver an emotionally charged sound track, nostalgic and gentle and he delivered in spades. The ending notes in particular are what resonate with me the most, it’s so graceful and haunting leaving the audience satisfied but strangely wanting more.

I’ve stated this before, but I’ll state it again, Zuckerman has one of the most unique sounds I have ever heard, being able to masterfully combine the spirit of the east with the soul of the west. This was primarily achieved by playing the Erhu like a violin, allowing it to boldly produce its authentic high pitched sounds whilst being surrounded by the versatility of western instruments. That’s no easy feat and the end product is a heart breaking piece of music, which will strike you at your core. Maybe I’m a lot more invested in this piece because it featured in Legend of Korra, particularly at the ending which was just a tidal wave of feelings. Maybe it’s just a beautiful piece of music that needs no context for it to overwhelm.

________________________________________________________________________

I have always struggled with articulating my thoughts on music and its impact. Unfortunately I am not musically literate and thus I often have to discuss the context of the musical piece or my personal experiences and thoughts attached to the melody instead of publishing a piece which breaks down the different approaches and methods used to produce said sounds.

There are still many other pieces of music I have yet to suggest and discuss about, as you can tell sadly there is a distinct lack of musical appearances from the Lord of the Rings franchise, a sin which I shall mend in my next musical article. Music is that splash of colour that everyone’s life needs and humanity’s ability to create art to entertain and heal, separates our species from every other living organism.

Hopefully these ten songs I have recommend and written about will resonate with you the same way it has affected me. We live in an age where war and death are more threatening then ever with technology proving to be both a curse and a blessing. We live in an age where the mobile phone may replace physical interactions.

Music is something which we can never forgo, not even for a second. It may be the bridge which unites us all.